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Read 2 More Letters Posted on LCCH Hospital Bond Levy (As of 10-25-2014 @ 11:22 am)
TODAY'S NEWS

Two More Letters Concerning the Hospital Bond Levy
Kyle J. Sparks and Kit & Mary Couchee


Rock Blasting-Related Closures Finished for the Year on Snoqualmie Pass
Drivers should still plan for delays due to 24 hour lane closures next week


City of Chelan AAU Youth Basketball Registration Deadline Nov 10
Coaches meeting Thursday, November 13


Three More Letters Concerning the Hospital Bond Levy
Jim and Kay Malvey, Pat Hautenne and John & Claudia Swenson


Garage Fire in the Brays Landing Area of Orondo
Fire took 20 minutes to contain and two hours to mop up


Parks Strategic Planning Process Looks at Trail Concepts and Special Events
Hiking, bicycling, mountain biking, horseback riding, and even water trails are being added to a City wish list


Lake Chelan School District Regular Board Meeting Agenda 10-28-14
School improvement plans on the agenda


Listen to More Reasons You Should Vote YES for the New Hospital
Lacey Lybecker, Timi Starkweather and Lexi Lieurance endorse the new hospital


Chelan Middle School Students Unite Against Bullying
As part of National Unity Day


Two More Letters Regarding the Hospital Bond Levy
Tom Warren and Dave Bernier, Ph.D. add more information to the bond picture


Randi Burchett Joins North Cascades Bank
Will serve as Real Estate Loan Officer


Detour for SR 153 Reestablished for Bridge Repair
Same 13 mile detour that was in effect for August flood washouts


Listen to Why You Should Vote YES for the New Hospital
Adam Rynd, Concie Luna and Kyle Plew endorse the new hospital


Here's 4 More Letters on the Lake Chelan Hospital Bond Levy
Dr. Christy C Nielsen, Professionals Larry Hibbard & Robert Thompson, Manson Resident Troy Hawkins and reader Wendy Griffiths Redman all weigh in with thought provoking discussions.


Pending Rain Across NCW Causes Officials To Issue Special Advisory


Open House at Forest Service in Tonasket
Learn more about a proposal for restoration work in the Bonaparte Mountain area


Chelan County PUD Commissioners Review Building Blocks of Next Year’s Budget
Key assumptions include no increase in electric rates and need to create value for customer-owners


Drivers May Begin Using Studded Tires in November
Winter’s on its way; make sure you and your vehicle are prepared


Halloween Safety Tips from Chelan Fire and Rescue
Don't feed gremlins after midnight


Lake Chelan Hospital/Manson School Cross Country Fun Run
160 people of all ages participated in the fun run


Three More Voters Weigh In With Letters To The Editor On Hottest Topic Of The Day - Lake Chelan Hospital's $19 Million Bond Proposition on the Nov 4th Ballot
Thanks to Pat Hautenne, Brent Morrison & Lisa Garvich for sharing their thoughts.


Free Diabetes Support Group Meetings Oct 28-29
Tuesday in Manson - Wednesday in Chelan









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About Letters To The Editor
With interest in the Lake Chelan Community Hospital Bond Issue increasing as Election Day approaches on Nov 4th, GoLakeChelan has made the decision to publish responsible "Letters to The Editor" and "Op-Ed Positions" on this topic from members of the community with the hope that open, healthy dialogue will give voters the best information.

Unlike our earlier Facebook Forum (which we terminated) letters published on our home page will be moderated (that is approved before being published), and may be edited to fit our format, or returned with a request that they be shorter.

Letters need to be submitted by email to and must include the authors name, valid email and working phone number. We will call and verify the authenticity of the author before publishing. The authors phone number and email will not be published at the author's request, but will be available to readers who requests to know.

We ask that submissions be civil and concise and respectful of those with differing opinions. Our goal is to provide for responsible dialogue on this important community issue. We will only publish one letter per writer, and retain the right to decline publishing a letter at our discretion


Two More Letters Concerning the Hospital Bond Levy
PHP-Nuke Oct 25, 2014
Below We Add 2 More 'Letters To GoLakeChelan' On The Lake Chelan Hospital Bond Measure
  • - Kyle J. Sparks, Chelan
  • - Kit & Mary Couchee, Chelan Volunteers since 2004
From: Kyle J. Sparks, Chelan
In considering the cost to my own family of the proposed Lake Chelan Community Hospital levy of $0.37 per $1,000 of assessed value, I found the cost to be quite nominal compared to previous offers to voters for a replacement LCCH facility. I believe that each person considering this issue will find the cost to be quite minor, and that the returns for a level access year-round, single-story facility with full access for all mobility, as well as modernization of infection control spaces and medical technology far outweigh personal costs.

To help illustrate this, I have included a calculator that anyone reading this letter can use to see their cost per year and per month (based on current assessment), should the levy be passed by the voters -- us.



I have opposed the previous offers by LCCH, but find this current proposal to be a good answer to the concerns we voiced over the previous two proposals. On the previous proposals, the community asked for reduced cost to tax payers, reduced cost on the new facility and better use of the proposed space. LCCH has answered: they have shouldered more of the costs themselves, reduced the overall cost in the process, and the proposed facility is designed for efficient use and growth without wasted space or space with ambiguous intended use. These are all positive changes from the previous proposals, and this proposal deserves our support.

And it won't break anyone's bank on top of it all ...

Kyle J. Sparks
Chelan

From: Kit & Mary Couchee
Vote YES for our Hospital!

Why do the signs say, “PROTECT OUR HOSPITAL”? The word PROTECT got your attention, didn’t it? It is true, that if we don’t pass the levy for the new hospital building now the costs will continue to escalate while we live on the edge of being shut down for non-compliance to updated laws and best practice.

What is the hospital levy going to cost you? $.37 per $1,000 assessed value.
$100,000 assessed value the additional tax will be $ 37.
$300,000 assessed value the additional tax will be $111.
$1,000,000 assessed value the additional tax will be $370.

What do you get for your additional tax dollars? A new hospital building that will be ADA compliant without expensive retrofits, space and capabilities for high-tech medical equipment, and patient privacy. We, the voters, voted down remodels of the old hospital two times, leading the current administration to study and determine it saves us more tax dollars to build new rather than bandage old.

What do you get when you pay taxes to support the hospital? You still (means you get this now) are eligible for an annual discount for the actual amount of taxes you paid, up to $500 per calendar year after your insurance payment. Simply bring a copy of your tax statement on your primary residence showing the tax for Lake Chelan Community Hospital. Your hospital out of pocket bill will be reduced by the hospital tax amount up to $500 a year.

Kit & Mary Couchee
Chelan Volunteers since 2004
Click Here for Previous Letters to the Editor & Op-Ed Comments on This Election Topic
With interest in the Lake Chelan Community Hospital Bond Issue increasing as Election Day approaches on Nov 4th, GoLakeChelan has made the decision to publish responsible "Letters to The Editor" and "Op-Ed Positions" on this topic from members of the community with the hope that open, healthy dialogue will give voters the best information.

Unlike our earlier Facebook Forum (which we terminated) letters published on our home page will be moderated (that is approved before being published), and may be edited to fit our format, or returned with a request that they be shorter.

Letters need to be submitted by email to and must include the authors name, valid email and working phone number. We will call and verify the authenticity of the author before publishing. The authors phone number and email will not be published at the author's request, but will be available to readers who requests to know.

We ask that submissions be civil and concise and respectful of those with differing opinions. Our goal is to provide for responsible dialogue on this important community issue. We will only publish one letter per writer, and retain the right to decline publishing a letter at our discretion

Posted by gregory_kennedy on Saturday, October 25 @ 11:22:51 PDT

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Rock Blasting-Related Closures Finished for the Year on Snoqualmie Pass
WSDOT Meagan Lott, WSDOT Communications - October 25, 2014
Rock Blasting-Related Closures Finished for the Year on Snoqualmie Pass
Drivers should plan for delays due to 24 hour lane closures next week

Drivers traveling across Interstate 90 will be happy to hear rock blasting-related closures on Snoqualmie Pass are finished for the year. However, drivers still need to plan for added travel time next week due to lane closures.

Starting Monday morning, Oct. 27 through Saturday morning, Nov. 1 contractor crews close a lane in each direction on I-90 between mileposts 56 to 61. These lane closures will be in effect 24 hours a day. Drivers may also experience delays due to daytime rolling slowdowns through the same location.

Posted by gregory_kennedy on Saturday, October 25 @ 11:04:59 PDT

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City of Chelan AAU Youth Basketball Registration Deadline Nov 10
City of Chelan Greg Kennedy - October 25, 2014
City of Chelan AAU Youth Basketball Registration Deadline Nov 10
The City of Chelan Parks & Recreation department is now accepting Registrations for AAU Youth Basketball grades K through 6th. Registration Deadline is Monday, November 10th.

Registration Fees:
  • Boys & Girls Grades K through 2 – CO-ED $25
  • Boys & Girls Grades 3 through 6 – $35
There is an additional cost of $17 for those that do not have a current AAU card. Current AAU cards have an expiration date of 8/31/2015.

Registration forms must be turned into the Park & Recreation Office

There is a coaches meeting on Thursday, November 13th, 7:00 pm, at MOE in Room 201.

First Practice is November 17th – First Game is December 13th – Last Game is January 31st.

Posted by gregory_kennedy on Saturday, October 25 @ 10:55:03 PDT

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Three More Letters Concerning the Hospital Bond Levy
PHP-Nuke Oct 24, 2014
Below We Add 3 More 'Letters To GoLakeChelan' On The Lake Chelan Hospital Bond Measure
  • - Jim and Kay Malvey, Chelan
  • - Pat Hautenne, Manson
  • - John & Claudia Swenson, Chelan
From: Jim and Kay Malvey, Chelan
Why We Support a New Hospital

We have read with interest the letters and flyers regarding the need of a new hospital to serve the medical needs of the people living and visiting the Lake Chelan Valley.

The hospital is a critical institution in the overall quality of life in our community.

Over the years our family has experienced first hand the services at our local hospital. Family members have had surgeries, childbirth, physical therapy, routine lab and radiology screenings as well as a life saving revival after an allergic reaction to a yellow jacket sting. All of these experiences were administered by positive, caring and competent professionals.

After reviewing all points for and against a new hospital it is clear to us that a new hospital will optimize the quality of care for patients because of better access, improved building efficiency, advanced equipment, more space and a safer environment for patients and staff.

Jim and Kay Malvey
Chelan, WA

From: Pat Hautenne, Manson
I asked the Hospital CEO last Monday night , why bonds? [He replied] They did not want to borrow from the US Government (Did not say why).

Section 242 provides for affordable financing for Hospitals. Instead of bonds, borrow the money from HUD. That will help all the retired property owners on fixed incomes.

Tom Jensen, former CEO of Grand Coulee Hospital and now CEO of Harbor Community Hospital, used HUD to help build their Critical Access Hospital. There are better ways than bonds. Read below:
"Can LCCH Afford to Build without Taxpayer Assistance?

HUD 242 funding . Section 242 of the National Housing Act provides mortgage insurance for acute care hospital facilities ranging from large teaching institutions to small rural critical access hospitals.

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) helps hospitals access affordable financing for capital projects. Uses may include new construction, refinancing, and modernization, remodeling, equipment, and expansion.

Tom Jensen, former CEO of Grand Coulee Hospital and now CEO of Harbor Community Hospital obtained creative funding from this program to build their Critical Access Hospital. The information was shared with the LCCH Hospital Commissioners during my tenure, but they wanted nothing to do with anything but voter-issued Bonds.
Please Vote No,

Pat Hautenne, Manson

From: John Swenson & Claudia Swenson, Chelan
We have been involved in hospital-based care as a hospital pharmacy administrator and clinical pharmacist for over 40 years in the Seattle/Tacoma area as well as most recently at Central Washington Hospital. We are very aware of the diagnostic, surgical and medication therapies that make a difference in that first critical hour or two after an acute major event (i.e. heart attack, stroke, etc).

The abilities of local physicians supported by EMS and a level 4 hospital emergency department can make the difference in surviving and thriving, or not, when these events strike. A new hospital with appropriate departmental space to accommodate new technology, new patient safety requirements and private rooms makes medical and patient care sense. At Central Washington Hospital, we saw firsthand the improvements in patient care, documentation of care, privacy and opportunities for family support when a new facility, including private rooms, was made available for all patients.

We are proud of this community and want it to thrive. A new, excellent critical access hospital in Chelan will allow us to retain current medical personnel and attract new providers. Being able to train medical and other health care provider students in our community requires an up to date hospital. Training programs expose students to our attractive community and aid in recruitment. For us, excellent local hospital-based care makes medical, quality of life and economic sense and a new hospital is the foundation of this focus.

We encourage one and all to vote YES for the new hospital.

John Swenson, BPharm, MS, FASHP
Claudia Swenson, PharmD, FASHP
Click Here for Previous Letters to the Editor & Op-Ed Comments on This Election Topic
With interest in the Lake Chelan Community Hospital Bond Issue increasing as Election Day approaches on Nov 4th, GoLakeChelan has made the decision to publish responsible "Letters to The Editor" and "Op-Ed Positions" on this topic from members of the community with the hope that open, healthy dialogue will give voters the best information.

Unlike our earlier Facebook Forum (which we terminated) letters published on our home page will be moderated (that is approved before being published), and may be edited to fit our format, or returned with a request that they be shorter.

Letters need to be submitted by email to and must include the authors name, valid email and working phone number. We will call and verify the authenticity of the author before publishing. The authors phone number and email will not be published at the author's request, but will be available to readers who requests to know.

We ask that submissions be civil and concise and respectful of those with differing opinions. Our goal is to provide for responsible dialogue on this important community issue. We will only publish one letter per writer, and retain the right to decline publishing a letter at our discretion

Posted by gregory_kennedy on Friday, October 24 @ 11:41:19 PDT

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Garage Fire in the Brays Landing Area of Orondo
PHP-Nuke Chief Jim Oatey, OFR - October 24, 2014
Garage Fire in the Brays Landing Area of Orondo
At 11:30 PM Orondo Fire and Chelan Fire 7 responded to the report of a garage fire in the Brays Landing area of Orondo, one mile north of Daroga Park. On arrival a two car garage occupied by two vehicles was found fully engulfed in flames. The fire had spread to the adjacent dwelling 20 feet from the garage.

Initial fire attack was on the dwelling fire, extinguishing fire to the siding, soffits and extension into the attic. A second crew applied water to the garage fire. The fire took 20 minutes to contain and an additional two hours to mop up.

The dwelling suffered $30,000 in damages with the garage and vehicles being a total loss of approximately $75,000. The cause of the fire is under investigation, but most likely emanated from a vehicle that was parked in the garage just prior to the discovery of the fire. The home’s resident relayed that he looked outside ten minutes after arriving home and parking his car to find his garage fully involved in fire.

The family of six was able to escape without injury and is staying with family. There were no firefighter injuries.


Posted by gregory_kennedy on Friday, October 24 @ 10:56:39 PDT

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http://chelanrealty.com


Parks Strategic Planning Process Looks at Trail Concepts and Special Events
News With Richard Uhlhorn Richard Uhlhorn - October 24, 2014
Paul Willard, Guy Evans, Charles Sablan and Tom Beckwith look over trail map overlays during a Parks trails meeting on the upcoming Parks six year update to its strategic plan that is in the process of being developed.
Tom Beckwith (beckwithconsult.com) is the City’s consultant charged with researching and writing a new City Parks Strategic Plan that will be proffered to the City Council sometime early next year for approval before next year’s GMA yearly update.
Larry Bradley, Parks Board member, weighed in on special events and concessions during a special meeting covering events and concessions.
Parks Director Charles Sablan is in charge of the Parks upcoming strategic plan.
Stacy Byquist owns Lakeshore Water Craft Rentals and took the time to cover his boat and jet ski operation out of Chelan’s Marina.
Parks Strategic Planning Process Looks at Trail Concepts and Special Events

By Richard Uhlhorn
One of the most often asked for recreational activities in the Lake Chelan Valley is a place to take a family for a hike without having to drive to a trail head. That request is being heard more and more by those in the position to make it happen.

Over the past several months, the City’s Chelan Parks & Recreation department and its consultant, Tom Beckwith (beckwithconsut.com) have been updating the Park Department’s PROS (Park, Recreation & Open Space) Plan.

Hiking, bicycling, mountain biking, horseback riding, and even water trails are being added to a City wish list. On Wednesday, October 15, a trails meeting was held in the City Hall Vision Room. This meeting was a part of the planning effort on recreation in the Lake Chelan Valley.

The planning process, which will continue over the next three months, is an optional element for the State’s required update to the Growth Management Act’s Comprehensive Plans. Parks Director Charles Sablan explained that while the Growth Management Act does not require Parks Departments to develop plans, Cities that do develop 20 year plans are eligible for Community Block Grants, and Recreation Conservation Office grants along with others. “We wouldn’t have been able to update Don Morse Park without a plan in place,” said Sablan.

When finished, the plan will serve as a roadmap for the City to use while planning for expected growth and demand identified by the community. Growth, of course, will increase the demand for these recreational pursuits and according to the Port of Chelan County; the Lake Chelan Valley’s increase in population will be near 50 percent of today’s population.

Beckwith created a series of map overlays of the Lake Chelan Valley for each type of user and asked us for our opinions and trail additions.

Russ Jones, Lake Chelan Sailing Association, asked, “What are the goals of this process?” Beckwith replied that the GMA requires certain plans be updated with a six year budget included. “Parks and Recreation are optional,” said Beckwith. “But cities cannot pursue projects unless it is in the plan (City’s Comprehensive Plan). We are taking a look at all recreational use and coordinating with other parties.”

Beckwith went on to say that if a trail concept is not on the plan, it can’t be developed. “The real issue is finances. Cities are starved for revenue. Long term maintenance of roads and parks are suffering.”

Currently the City of Chelan does not tax users of its parks, but relies on other services to bring in revenue. These include the Lakeside RV Park, parking lot revenue, special event revenue and concessionaire revenue.

At the Wednesday evening trails meeting Paul Willard, Coron Polley, Guy Evans , Beckwith and Sablan went over a series of maps of the Valley with overlays of walking, biking, horseback riding and hiking trails on separate maps. The information put together was derived from 129 responses received back out of 400 emails sent out.

One of the most requested or asked for activities in the Valley are hiking/biking trails close to town. The overlays look at every potential trail that might be developed on the road and off the road.

Paul Willard, Chelan Ranger District’s resource manager said, “It’s better to not create false expectations.” Beckwith replied that if a trail is not listed on the plan, it can’t be developed (by the City). “The real issue is finances,” said Beckwith. “How do we pay for things.”

Some of the ideas that came out included developing horseback trails on Deer Mountain that would allow riders to access the trails from Union Valley. The other idea was accessing trail easements on powerline easements.

Beckwith explained that visitors fall within five major groups; Historic, Cultural, Agricultural, Environmental and Recreation. “Visitors come here for their niche, but once here, there are other things available to do like visiting a winery and so forth.”

Polley and Willard went through the current trail planning effort on Chelan Butte and the trail building for mountain biking and hiking at Echo Ridge.

A copy of the Comprehensive Trails Plan developed by the Lake Chelan Recreation Association and adopted by numerous agencies and organizations was given to Beckwith for background on past planning efforts. He was also given a list of the survey that was conducted at that time showing potential user’s level of interest

Willard also talked about the Forest Service plans to designate water trails on Lake Chelan. Water trails were addressed in the old trails comprehensive plan and there are a number of campsites up-lake that would that has potential for kayakers and canoeists. Beckwith commented that the Columbia River didn’t seem to be a good fit for water trails. Mike Stowe, Chelan Valley Tours, recently kayaked from Wells Dam to Beebe Park with the idea of guiding kayaking tours along the river. He found the experience very rewarding. So Beckwith was told that this potential opportunity should be added to the concept plans.

Willard and Polley agreed to supply overlays of their trail mapping of Chelan Butte and other areas in the Lake Chelan Valley.

The trails portion of the plan is far from done. Beckwith expects to have a completed draft by the end of this year. There will be more public hearings on the draft proposals. Planning Director Craig Gildroy expects to address the Parks Plan in the next Comprehensive Plan update in 2015.

On Thursday evening, October 16, the Parks Department and Beckwith held another meeting with individuals who either conduct special events on City Property or have a City contract for Concessions operating out of the City Park property.

Russ Jones, Lake Chelan Sailing Association and Stacy Byquist, Lakeshore Watercraft Rentals, Peri Gallucci, Chelan City Clerk, joined Beckwith, Sablan and Parks Director Larry Bradley to discuss their operations.

Jones explained that the Sailing Association conducts free sailing lessons and organizes the annual Lake Chelan Sailing Regatta. He explained to Beckwith that the regatta was an event that always took place after Labor Day in what is commonly termed the shoulder season. Jones said the reason for holding sailing regatta after Labor day was to keep the costs down when the boat launching fees from the City launch dropped off. “It was less expensive for our participants,” said Jones.

The City now charges launch fees after Labor Day which has forced the organization to request a fee waiver. Jones calls the regatta a wash for the City. “The City gives up about $500 in launch fees, but takes in a little more than $600 from moorage. It also gets some regatta participants staying at the RV Park.” Jones stated that the sailing regatta is a minor net for the city but also a cultural event.

Beckwith asked where the participants came from and Jones replied that they were from B.C., Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

He was asked how many boats the association has. Jones said they currently own 20 boats and members of the sailing association pay $25 per year and are required to give four hours of volunteer time each year, but membership allows them to use the sailboats anytime. “It provides inexpensive access to the lake,” said Jones.

Asked where the students come from, Jones replied that most are from a 40 mile radius from Chelan. “Demand is good,” said Jones. “The classes are full by January and the students come from the region.” The profile of the average student is women in the 30 to 45 year range, kids with parents and seniors up to 85 years of age.

He also said the City is compensated about $12,000 per year from free sailing lessons (36 students per year at 18 hours of training per student at an average cost of $300 to $500 per student).

Chelanman Multi Sport Weekend was also discussed with Larry Bradley remarking that it takes place at a time (late July) when the valley is already full of visitors. “It overtaxes our facilities,” said Bradley. “Are the benefits versus the tradeoff worth the benefit?”

Beckwith asked if the City was charging primetime rates for the use of its facilities. Sablan replied that the City didn’t specifically charge the organizer, but charges the event out-of-pocket expenses such as cleaning the bathrooms and picking up garbage during the event. “That’s something City Council would have to address,” said Sablan.

“It is the one event we get the most complaints about,” said Gallucci.

Chelanman attracts an average 2,500 participants and their families and friends for the weekend. It is a totally volunteer support event with the exception of timing and event photography services. The local school athletic programs provide volunteer labor. This past year had both high school and middle school volleyball teams helping with concessions and timing.

The major benefit of Chelanman is that after all expenses are paid out, the net profits go into the Chelanman Foundation. These funds are then dispersed to many programs supporting the Valley’s youth.

Jon and Chris Courtright were unable to attend the special event meeting because they were in Mexico, but this is one more shoulder season event that is becoming more and more successful. It also requires moorage and launch fee waivers to hold down costs. “This is the first year that this event filled the RV Park,” said Sablan.

Stacy Byquist, owner of Shoreline Water Craft Rentals, has operated his concession out of the Park system for the past eight years. He also operates out of Wapato Point, Manson Bay and occasionally Lake Chelan Shores.

Byquist explained that his customers are primarily vacationers. “I rent a lot of boats to families and jet skis (personal watercraft) to young adults.” Customers have to be 18 or older to rent and have a State required boater’s license or a temporary on-site provided license that makes them accept responsibility for their actions on the water.

Originally, Byquist bid for the marina concession against 14 other companies. “We now have three and no one is mobile anymore.” He stated that when he first started Lakeshore he wanted to pay the City a percentage, but they turned him down. “They can’t enter an agreement like that,” said Byquist. “The State Auditor won’t allow it.” So he came up with a figure he was willing to pay and has a contract with an escalation clause per year in it. “It renews every five years.”

Bradley said, “They add a tremendous value to the Park system.” He said that the City very seldom put out a request for services. “Most businesses are established by the individuals coming to the parks,” added Bradley. “Ninety percent of the concessions are created by concessionaires.”

“This is a big issue,” said Sablan. “We have to strike a proper balance.”

Beckwith wondered if restaurants and motels/resorts should be helping. “This is an opportunity to get on it.”

“We are taking a look at all recreational use and coordinating with other parties,” said Beckwith. “Cities can’t pursue projects unless it is in the plan. The uses have to have some standing and be financially feasible. We are looking at everything… a check and balance and… some strategy to pay for it.” He also said the plan is looking at the public benefit. “Where is the public benefit.”

There is a survey residents can take regarding park usage. It is located at: http://www.cityofchelan.us/pdfdocs/ChelanResidentParksSurvey.pdf.

Take the time to take the survey and help the Parks Department with its planning process for the future.


Posted by gregory_kennedy on Friday, October 24 @ 10:32:06 PDT

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Lake Chelan School District Regular Board Meeting Agenda 10-28-14
Lake Chelan School District Georgia Mashayekh - October 24, 2014
Lake Chelan School District Regular Board Meeting Agenda 10-28-14
LAKE CHELAN SCHOOL DISTRICT
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
DATE: October 28, 2014
TIME: 6:00pm
LOCATION: District Board Room

AGENDA
1. CALL TO ORDER
2. APPROVAL OF AGENDA
3. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – October 24, 2014
4. PUBLIC COMMENTS OR REQUESTS ON NON-AGENDA ITEMS
5. INFORMATIONAL /DISCUSSION ITEMS
6. BOARD REPORTS
   * School Improvement Plans
   * Morgen Owings Elementary – Jeff Peck & Jesica Bryant
   * Chelan High School – Barry DePaoli
   * Holden Village School – Kelly Kronbauer
7. Superintendent Report
   * Board meeting on Tues. 11/11
   * WSSDA Conference 11/19-11/22
8. FINANCIAL REPORT
   * County Treasurer’s Report
   * Balance Sheet
   * Cash Flow Statement
   * Enrollment
9. ACTION ITEMS
   * Payables and Payroll
   * Personnel
10. ADJOURNMENT


Posted by gregory_kennedy on Friday, October 24 @ 09:55:36 PDT

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Listen to More Reasons You Should Vote YES for the New Hospital
PHP-Nuke Greg Kennedy - October 22, 2014
The following is a paid commercial message from Chelan Valley Citizens for a New Hospital
- "We are concerned citizens passionate about healthcare and the new hospital. We are paying for ads and signs through donations and fundraising."
Listen to Why You Should Vote YES for the New Hospital
From Northwest MedStar to Kevin Abel, LCCH CEO

"Northwest MedStar has recently learned of your long-term health care facility plan and commends you for your ongoing commitment to maintaining emergency and primary care to your community members. Investments in emergency departments and helipads, such as those proposed in your new hospital plan, improve safety, care and access to patients in time-critical situations ... in collaboration with hospitals and EMS agencies throughout the north central Washington region, Northwest MedStar is committed to serving your patients. We recognize investment in facilities, the latest technologies and the team members that provide care is a commitment to better serve our mutual patients. We appreciate your continued support of Northwest MedStar and wish you success in your facility plans."
Chamber of Commerce Endorses New Hospital

"I am writing on behalf of the Lake Chelan Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. At a recent board meeting we voted to support and endorse the upcoming Hospital Levy on November 4, 2014.

This vote is not just about replacing an aging hospital facility. It is about maintaining the quality of life we enjoy in the Lake Chelan Valley and about further developing the economic vitality of our communities. A new hospital will improve our ability to recruit physicians and will encourage new businesses to relocate and bring with them well paying jobs that are compatible with the “Quality of Life” we all enjoy. A new hospital for the Lake Chelan Valley and surrounding hospital district will have a significant effect on our local economy both in the short and the long term.

The Lake Chelan Community Hospital is a Rural Critical Access Hospital. The National Center for Rural Health has measured the economic impact that Critical Access Hospitals have on their communities. For every three jobs at a Critical Access Hospital another job is created in the local community. Our local hospital employs over 250 people and is one of our community’s largest employers. They provide a large portion of families in our valley with living wage jobs. Those families pay property tax, enroll children in our schools and contribute to our retail districts. The total impact, including retail sales that Critical Access Hospital has on a community exceeds $10,5million.

Beyond the economic impacts of hospital operations the community hospital brings to our valley, there are tremendous economic impacts when constructing a new facility. Average direct employment resulting from construction of a new Rural Critical Access Facility is 182 jobs with a secondary impact of 66 jobs. The average total income impact for the combined operations and construction of a new facility is $10.3 million. Retail sales can be expected to increase by about $2.5 million.

The Lake Chelan Chamber of Commerce exists to drive economic growth through leadership, advocacy, and promotion that enhances the quality of life in the Lake Chelan Valley. We believe that building a new Lake Chelan Community Hospital meets that mission and we ask you to join us and vote YES for a new hospital on November 4, 2014."

Lester C. Cooper, President
Board of Directors, Lake Chelan Chamber of Commerce


Posted by gregory_kennedy on Friday, October 24 @ 09:19:38 PDT

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Chelan Middle School Students Unite Against Bullying
Lake Chelan School District Brad Wilson - October 23, 2014
Chelan Middle School Students Unite Against Bullying
CMS Students stood united against bullying yesterday by wearing orange as part of National Unity Day. October has been Unity Month at CMS, with teachers and students discussing a variety of topics connected to bullying and focusing on ways to show unity.


Posted by gregory_kennedy on Thursday, October 23 @ 10:42:33 PDT

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Two More Letters Regarding the Hospital Bond Levy
PHP-Nuke Oct 23, 2014
Below We Add 2 More 'Letters To GoLakeChelan' On The Lake Chelan Hospital Bond Measure
  • - Tom Warren, Chairman, Board of Commissioners, Lake Chelan Community Hospital
  • - Dave Bernier, Ph.D.
From: Tom Warren, Chairman, Board of Commissioners, Lake Chelan Community Hospital
Dear Community,

We are writing in response to letters by Larry Hibbard submitted to Go Lake Chelan and other media sources. The hospital worked with Mr. Hibbard for many years and appreciated his service.While both an October 20th letter from Mr. Hibbard and the hospital commissioners agree that additional space is required by the hospital, we disagree on how that would be best achieved. This is our response.

To begin, this election is not an either/or discussion . A remodel plan was presented to the community in 2006 and 2007. It was rejected twice. Residents asked us to change course and build a replacement hospital in a new location. After extensive research, we presented a new plan to the community. That is the proposal currently on your ballots. If the project does not receive a sixty percent vote yes, there is no plan to pursue a large remodel for the existing building.

In an effort to clear up any misinformation in the community, we address the following points:

The October 20th letter states, “They have spent several million dollars of our money on plans and PR for a new facility. We have not spent several million dollars on plans and PR for the replacement facility. Collins Woerman is the architectural firm working on the project, and we have expended $514,795. We also paid for soil testing and surveying of the property (we believe the letter inadvertently includes the cost of the property as planning). For public relations, we hosted several informational meetings on the project with handouts and sent an informational mailer to community members. Signs and advertisements in the community are provided and funded by an independent citizens committee.

The October 20th letter states, “Our present operating hospital has a value of well over $20,000,000. The estimate of $20,000,000 is not accurate.Pacific Appraisal Associates P.L.L.C. values the existing hospital and property at $2,095,000.The book value of the existing building is $1,648,495.LCCH would sell the property after the completion of the new hospital.We currently have an agreement with Heritage Heights for a first right of refusal for the property for a memory care facility.

The October 20th letter states, “The bones and most systems in our hospital are in good shape. Current facility staff working in the building and formal evaluations of the facility indicate there are major issues with the hospital's infrastructure.The report from Botesch, Nash and Hall Architects list the exterior, interior, ADA, HVAC, medical gas, stairs and elevators as marginal in condition. Plumbing and fire protection is inadequate. See below for a link to that and other reports.

CDi Engineers HVAC, Fire Protection and Plumbing Systems Evaluation state, “In general, many of the systems observed are in need of significant upgrade to adequately meet the needs of the building. The CDi Engineers' report estimates the cost for plumbing, domestic water and HVAC upgrades at several million dollars.The Magnusson Klemencic Associates Gravity and Seismic Performance Report rates LCCH as satisfactory for a life safety performance objective and marginal for an immediate occupancy performance objective.

The October 20th letter states, “The present hospital site is tight, but there are options for expansion.The hospital owns the hillside behind and the building below.Adjacent property to the west can most likely be purchased. The architectural firms that have reviewed the property indicate that the slope behind the hospital is too costly to develop.The land directly below the hospital is a 28-unit senior living apartment building and residential buildings are to the west.Any expansion on the existing site would entail a costly parking garage or land acquisition.In addition to the land issues, it is costly and difficult to remodel and expand an existing hospital while keeping it open 24/7 for patient care.

The October 20th letter states a remodel and expansion is less expensive than the replacement facility.The budget for the 2006 expansion/remodel is roughly equivalent to the proposal for a replacement facility.The primary difference between the earlier election and now is that the hospital is asking for significantly less on this public bond, as we would carry a portion of the debt. Hospital debt capacity analysis was done by a national accounting firm, and the funds would be the same for a remodel/expansion or a replacement facility at $10 million.We disagree with the October 20th letter's assertion that we could use 100% of the hospital operating funds for a building, as that amount is within ranges generally accepted by hospitals, and it is used for accounts payable, payroll and other standard operating costs.

A second letter from Mr. Hibbard states the new facility will not increase the number of beds. While the hospital will remain a 25-bed critical access hospital, the new building's additional OR recovery,observation and procedure rooms will add to inpatient capacity on the medical / surgical unit. The ER will also expand from five to eight rooms plus a triage area. Undersized patient care areas in the current building, like physical and occupational therapy, lab and radiology, will also be expanded.

Also, to clarify, the proposed project's budget includes the cost of all hospital equipment and furnishing. The majority of our current equipment will be transferred to the new building. The budget and other documents, including a summary of the current hospital facility condition, evaluation of its systems, appraisal, seismic and soil evaluations, are available at http://healthylakechelanvalley.org/news-events/document-review-center. You will also find the recent Lake Chelan Valley healthcare industry assessment from the Port of Chelan on that page.

CollinsWoerman, our architectural firm, specializes in healthcare and has worked for facilities like Swedish Medical Center and Virginia Mason. They also focus on smaller, rural hospitals like ours, designing buildings that focus on functionality, cost and energy efficiency.

Hospitals make choices to expand and renovate or build new based on their specific circumstances.There are several examples of both new hospitals and expansions in Washington State and across the country.We, as your Board of Commissioners, have seriously considered both options. With the assistance of our architects and advisors, we have determined that a replacement hospital is the best choice for the community from a financial, operational and patient care perspective.That is the project on your ballot.

Sincerely,

Tom Warren, Chairman, Board of Commissioners, Lake Chelan Community Hospital


From: Dave Bernier, Ph.D.
Dear Residents of Chelan County Public Hospital District #2

Lake Chelan Community Hospital (LCCH),

As a former CEO with "inner knowledge" of many of the issues at LCCH, I have remained in contact with many residents, business-owners, and employees of LCCH, many of whom also shared concerns, not just for a new hospital, but the financial burden everyone will have to endure if the bond passes. After LCCH debut a film, many became skeptical of the authenticity of the issues in the film.  I have been asked by many to give my opinion regarding the information that has been published.

Are you wondering what the real truth is regarding the need for a new Lake Chelan Hospital? What information should the Hospital share with you to justify the need for a new facility? What information should you ask them?

I common theme when I talked to friends was that they were afraid to speak up because it may hurt their business and/or jeopardize their job at LCCH, and that it's common knowledge that many people continue to try to make ends meet in today's challenging economic times.

I was asked to carefully review the websitewww.healthylakechelanvalley.org, as well as a video posted on YouTube, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7zB9AaH1

Not only did I review the information above but I also researched and analyzed Annual Reports published on the LCCH website, www.LCCH.net. The LCCH Annual Reports inform the community of various statistics such as number of Emergency Room Visits, Admissions, etc., for the year. I also reviewed audits from the Washington State Auditor's Office, and many more documents referenced below.

In addition, as a result of my review of invoices from LCCH, I found $7,469.00 in legal expenses that were overpaid by LCCH. Needless to say, my heart continues to be in the right place as a good steward of our taxpayer funds.

To address all of the issues, a comprehensive slide presentation was prepared of the issues addressed by LCCH and provided facts and supporting documentation regarding information that is misleading to the community. While you may have seen this presentation on GLC last week, I added more information to it.Please click the attached link to view the presentation:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ikmtm1a99jft4fp/AADngKTgGNRf6itAj63GmMAwa?dl=0

While reviewing many documents, as many individuals thought, much of the information presented by LCCH contains information that is misleading at best and deceptive, fraudulent, and/or unethical at worst. Many of the statements by LCCH are contrary to information reported in the Washington State Auditor's Office Financial Reports.

While the intent of asking me for an “independent, unbiased opinion of the issues was not to sabotage the community's support and/or vote for the construction of a replacement hospital, the resolve to seeking an independent opinion was to determine what is true and what isn't.  Considering that I continue to have family and friends in the area, I still have a soft spot for the Valley in my heart.

Please let your neighbors know about this post as it will have a lasting impact on the community for years to come.

Sincerely,

Dave Bernier, Ph.D.

Click Here for Previous Letters to the Editor & Op-Ed Comments on This Election Topic
With interest in the Lake Chelan Community Hospital Bond Issue increasing as Election Day approaches on Nov 4th, GoLakeChelan has made the decision to publish responsible "Letters to The Editor" and "Op-Ed Positions" on this topic from members of the community with the hope that open, healthy dialogue will give voters the best information.

Unlike our earlier Facebook Forum (which we terminated) letters published on our home page will be moderated (that is approved before being published), and may be edited to fit our format, or returned with a request that they be shorter.

Letters need to be submitted by email to and must include the authors name, valid email and working phone number. We will call and verify the authenticity of the author before publishing. The authors phone number and email will not be published at the author's request, but will be available to readers who requests to know.

We ask that submissions be civil and concise and respectful of those with differing opinions. Our goal is to provide for responsible dialogue on this important community issue. We will only publish one letter per writer, and retain the right to decline publishing a letter at our discretion

Posted by gregory_kennedy on Thursday, October 23 @ 10:10:25 PDT

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// http://


Randi Burchett Joins North Cascades Bank
PHP-Nuke North Cascades Bank - October 22, 2014
Randi Burchett
Randi Burchett Joins North Cascades Bank
Will serve as Real Estate Loan Officer

Randi Burchett has joined North Cascades Bank, Division of Glacier Bank, as a Real Estate Loan Officer working at the bank’s Chelan branch at 220 Johnson Avenue.

Burchett graduated from Eastmont High School in East Wenatchee and attended the University of Washington. She began her banking career with Seafirst Bank in Customer Service and Private Banking and then transitioned into lending at Washington Mutual. Over the years, she developed an expertise in residential and consumer lending, most recently working at Cashmere Valley Bank. “Randi is a great addition to our real estate lending group and to our team in Chelan. As real estate activity is picking up throughout the region, our timing couldn’t be better in bringing on a lender with Randi’s experience and excellent reputation,” said President Scott Anderson.

Burchett lives in Chelan with her husband and has two grown children. She is an avid golfer and her interests include traveling, outdoor activities and spending time with her family.

North Cascades Bank is a division of Glacier Bank of Kalispell, Montana. Glacier Bank is a subsidiary of Glacier Bancorp, Inc. (GBCI), a regional bank holding company headquartered in Kalispell, Montana, operating thirteen bank divisions including North Cascades Bank. These bank divisions provide financial services to individuals and community based businesses throughout Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. Additional information about the bank can be found at www.northcascadesbank.com.


Posted by gregory_kennedy on Wednesday, October 22 @ 11:57:00 PDT

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Detour for SR 153 Reestablished for Bridge Repair
WSDOT Jeff Adamson, WSDOT Communications - October 22, 2014
Detour for SR 153 Reestablished for Bridge Repair
A routine WSDOT inspection of the Methow River Bridge on SR 153 at Carlton revealed a crack in a column requiring the bridge be closed immediately to traffic until repairs can be completed.

The same 13 mile detour that was in effect for August flood washouts between Carlton and Twisp on SR 153 that ended last week is being reestablished on Okanogan County’s Twisp-Carlton Rd.

WSDOT bridge engineers are now designing the repair, making a plan and arranging for steel sections and dowels that will be needed as well as crews to do the work. Repairs could perhaps be accomplished as soon as next week if material and personnel are available.

Posted by gregory_kennedy on Wednesday, October 22 @ 11:44:21 PDT

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Listen to Why You Should Vote YES for the New Hospital
PHP-Nuke Greg Kennedy - October 22, 2014
The following is a paid commercial message from Chelan Valley Citizens for a New Hospital
- "We are concerned citizens passionate about healthcare and the new hospital. We are paying for ads and signs through donations and fundraising."
Listen to Why You Should Vote YES for the New Hospital



Did you know the CEO of Confluence Health endorses the new hospital?

"As a property owner in the Lake Chelan Hospital District and a member of the health care community of Chelan and Douglas counties, I am writing in support of the bond levy for development of a new Lake Chelan Community Hospital (LCCH).

The current LCCH was built in 1972, approximately 42 years ago. The current hospital is not at the minimum level necessary for a highly-functioning, effective, and cost-efficient facility, and is not able to be modified to meet that requirement.

I encourage your support of the Bond levy being proposed.

Peter Rutherford, MD
CEO Confluence Health, Wenatchee"


Posted by gregory_kennedy on Wednesday, October 22 @ 09:55:55 PDT

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Four More Letters from Readers Regarding the Hospital Bond Levy
PHP-Nuke Oct 21, 2014
Below We Add 4 More 'Letters To GoLakeChelan' On The Lake Chelan Hospital Bond Measure

  • - From Dr. Christy C Nielsen, RPh, PharmD, CCI
  • - From Valley Residents Larry Hibbard & Robert Thompson
  • - From Reader Wendy Griffiths Redman
  • - From Manson Resident Troy Hawkins
  • From: Dr. Christy C Nielsen, RPh, PharmD, CCI
    Dear Friends:

    A strong local hospital is essential for the health and well being of all of us living and visiting the valley. My conclusion after working in this facility as the pharmacist since 2005 is that construction of a new hospital on a flat piece of ground with good access for staff, visitors and vendors is the most economically responsible choice versus renovation of the existing structure with its many inherent deficiencies. Suggestions by some of those who oppose the proposed bond to remedy these deficiencies, include expansion of the current building, purchase of land adjacent to the present facility, evicting residents of the housing located in the old 1948 hospital building, blasting, excavating and relocating bedrock from the cliff behind the facility, and topping it all off with a helicopter on the roof. The hospital has made an exhaustive study of the various scenarios that could be pursued to remedy the current situation, utilizing financial consultants, architects and engineers who are experienced in hospital construction. All indicators of cost effectiveness and future functionality point to the fact that the community would be best served, in the long run, by relocating and replacing the facility. Past elections on this issue have always resulted in a majority vote for the proposal, just missing the needed “super majority” of 60% by 1-4%. Clearly this does not indicate an out and out rejection by the community.

    I am keenly aware, as an employee of the hospital that my opinion may be dismissed out of hand as biased, but I am also a citizen and a voter. Yes, I confess - I do have a bias – I have a professional bias, (a.k.a. knowledge) and a professional obligation to insure that the pharmacy services under my direction meet the basic standards of care that are expected of any hospital pharmacy. During my tenure I have been fortunate to implement technologies that are now considered basic equipment used in a hospital pharmacy department. That said, the facility is now confronting significant barriers to optimizing the medication distribution system due to space not being available to accommodate needed additional equipment in the five patient care areas. More significant is that the infrastructure required for compounding sterile products (e.g. IV solutions) does not meet minimum standards that are currently under regulatory review by the Pharmacy Commission. Needed infrastructure includes a purpose built clean room and ante room with strict requirements for flooring, wall treatments, venting and filtering requiring at least 100 square feet of space – which is not absolutely NOT available in the current structure. These technologies are not luxury items or nice to have, but are considered the standard of care to insure basic patient safety and security in medication usage – in any hospital. Retrofitting the current building with updated technologies will be difficult and costly, especially if patient care activities will need to continue at the same time. My department is not unique in this respect.

    This video outlines some of the issues confronted by other departments:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7zB9AaH1_A

    Some opponents have suggested that we are trying to compete with or duplicate services available in Wenatchee, Seattle or Spokane. However, most health care is not delivered by specialists, but by primary care providers – i.e. your local family doctor. Primary care practitioners utilize many tools to provide the care that each of us need to remain healthy, to treat us when we are ill or injured, and to assist us in accessing specialty care when it is needed. One of those necessary tools utilized by primary care is a local hospital that supports many types of activities within the scope of primary care practice model which includes, but is not limited to emergency care, inpatient care, detox-rehab program, mental health care, observation, labor and delivery, diagnostic procedures, radiology, laboratory services, as well as surgery. It’s the diversity of the types of care activities housed within the hospital building that make up the whole that has created the financial viability of LCCH. Physicians need adequate workspaces in the ER, OR and private patient rooms to maximize the use of their particular skills. Nurses, respiratory therapists, physical therapists, medical technologists, radiology technicians, OR technicians, sterile processing technicians, anesthetists, and pharmacists also need adequate workspaces to support their activities, needed equipment and provide a decent experience for patients. Studies have shown that hospitals in rural communities are a major economic driver. Why send health care dollars away, when they can be spent here, supporting our local economy?

    Communities in our area DO replace inadequate hospital structures. For example, in 2010 Grand Coulee, built a new facility. That facility was built on the same piece of land as the old structure, which was flat and spacious, on the existing parking lot, followed by demolition of the old building and restoration of parking when the new building was opened. On the other hand, Pullman chose to relocate and rebuild the hospital, moving it away from a tight location on campus. I have had direct personal involvement with both communities as a health care practitioner, working in both of the original Pullman and Grand Coulee facilities. I was involved in the planning and decision making for the pharmacy in the replacement hospital in Grand Coulee.

    To recap, because there seems to be continued misrepresentation and misinformation around the proposal: the bond levy to the voters will raise $19,000,000 over 30 years with an additional $12,000,000 raised on the hospital’s debt carrying capacity. The sum of $31,000,000 dollars includes the total costs of planning, construction and equipping the new facility, including a 10% buffer for any cost over-runs. This amount was arrived at after much investigation and careful deliberation with financial, architectural and engineering experts. Concerns have been raised about potential contamination at the proposed site. A thorough assessment was done prior to the land purchase and was noted to be comparable to the land where Walmart, ball-fields, and a housing development currently exist in the same vicinity. Any costs associated with remediation have already been included in the proposed plan. Finally, the land, purchased in 2009 for $4,000,000, is already paid for. Keep in mind that no new large parcels of flat land with good access close to town are being created. Responsible, caring communities make sensible decisions based on careful consideration of all factors to achieve the best possible outcome in the long run – the best solution for one community might not be the best solution for another. This isn’t a case of “wanting a new hospital for the sake of having something new”, but a wise investment in the preservation of viable health care in our local area. I believe the strongest choice is to VOTE YES for a replacement hospital for our community.

    Sincerely, Dr. Christy C Nielsen, RPh, PharmD, CCI




    Valley residents Larry Hibbard & Robert Thompson have been some of the most outspoken critics of the proposed Proposition 1 Bond Levy. The two have submitted their Op-Ed as it appeared a few days ago in the Wenatchee World.

    A strong local hospital providing essential emergency care and basic hospital services is important for the health and well being of all of us living in the Chelan Valley. Unfortunately, the maintenance and repair of our hospital has been largely neglected in recent years as the Hospital Commissioners focused on rationalizing a new hospital. In the last five years over $7 million, including $4.1 million for land, has been spent on “future hospital construction” (from annual audit reports). Now the Hospital Commissioners are asking us to approve a $19 million, 30 year bond issue for a new hospital and abandon our existing hospital because the hospital needs repairs.

    During the last six months we have spent many hours with Kevin Abel, the hospital CEO, and others asking questions, learning more about our hospital, reviewing studies, looking at plans and analyzing reports. Additionally, Larry worked for the hospital as an architect for more than 15 years, including the time 15,200 sq ft of new space was added to our hospital. We have found a serious lack of substantive information that would justify building a new hospital.

    Our conclusion, following our investigation, is that the construction of a new Chelan hospital is not in the best interest of quality health care in the valley and is not economically responsible. Our best health care option is to remodel and expand our existing hospital. Our hospital has been neglected but it can be fixed at less cost than a new hospital. Moreover, the current hospital building has a value of over $20 million if used as a hospital but has negative value if abandoned. And the building cannot be used cost effectively as a retirement home. We have based our conclusions on the following:

  • 1. There are no structural problems with the building. While the original concrete framed building is 42 years old, a third of the hospital space, 15,195 square feet, is less than 20 years old and is in fine shape. Structurally sound hospitals are not abandoned; they are continually renovated because reuse is the most economical option.
  • 2. The third floor has few, if any, code issues and would require only minimal renovation. The third floor was constructed less than 20 years ago with steel framing and met all codes current at that time.
  • Communities Don't Abandon Their Hospitals, They Renew Them

  • 3. The infrastructure, technology, and “code issues,” can easily be addressed in a remodel. Single pane windows are replaced with energy efficient glazing. Doorways are widened. Bathrooms are enlarged for accessibility. Technology access is provided. And HVAC systems are upgraded. None of these issues require a new building.
  • 4. There are good options for expansion. The hospital owns the hillside behind and the building below. Adjacent property can most likely be purchased if needed. And the existing concrete and steel building can easily accommodate additional floors front and back.
  • 5. The proposed new hospital will not increase the number of certified beds in the hospital or add new hospital services. (per letter from hospital administrator dated 9/29/2014) A renovation/addition of our existing hospital can accommodate all of the patients and programs proposed for the new hospital at much less cost.
  • 6. The full cost of a new hospital will be close to $40,000,000. The $31 million LCCH cost is only the construction budget and some furnishings. In addition, the land cost $4.1 million (that was purchased with out any public discussion or voter support), approximately $3 million has been spent to date on planning and promotion, with an additional $4-6 million likely needed for equipment and furnishings, moving costs, soil mitigation and decommissioning.
  • 7. Renovating the existing hospital will not require abandoning a $20+ million special purpose building. The hospital commissioners have no viable plan for reuse of the existing hospital, which is valued at $20+ million as a hospital. Heritage Heights has been given first refusal, but it is highly unlikely they can justify tripling the size of their facilities or justify renovation costs for senior housing that for them would be much higher than constructing new. Hospitals are specific purpose buildings with complex and expensive infrastructure that are not suitable for other uses. This is why hospitals are not abandoned, but are continually renovated.
  • 8. A renovation/addition to the existing hospital would cost much less than a new hospital and eliminate the need for a $19 million taxpayer bond issue. A renovation/addition of our critical care hospital can be completed in the range of $17 to 20 million. To pay for the renovation we could use the $5 million the hospital has in reserve, the sale of the $4.1 million site purchased in 2009, and the sale of $10 million non-voted hospital bonds proposed for the new hospital.
  • 9. There are many examples of successful hospital renovations, including the Leavenworth, Omak, Ritzville, and Prosser hospitals in our area. Communities don’t abandon their hospitals, they renew them.

    We will be voting NO, to be financially responsible and to Save Our Hospital.

    Sincerely,

    Larry Hibbard

    Robert Thompson
  • Larry Hibbard is a professional architect who lives in Manson.
    Robert Thompson was 22 years, Chief Budget and Finance Officer for the University of Washington, followed by 14 years at Georgia Institute of Technology as Executive Vice President of Administration and Finance, with retirement in 2008. Thompson lives in Chelan.



    Letter to the Editor
    Submitted by Wendy Griffiths Redman

    Dear Friends…

    I couldn't imagine there would be people writing in this forum urging people to oppose the bond measure for the replacement hospital….but it’s true. There aren't many, but there are a few. I’ve read a letter from a man who used to be an architect for the hospital who no longer has a contract and a former CEO of the hospital who was fired by the Hospital Commissioners (unfairly he says, but we have to wait and buy his book)? I don’t know either of these gentlemen, nor do I know the people who have written in to endorse their comments. But to be honest, neither of these gentlemen seem like unbiased observers, I've also read letters from doctors and employees of the hospital and to be honest again, they probably aren't unbiased either.

    My advice to anyone who wants to know how to vote on this bond initiative is to talk to someone who has recently been a patient or had a family member as a patient. The modest, but vital, services provided to our community by LCCH are a blessing for those of us who have been in either situation. Better yet, go yourself and take a look. The inadequate space for essential services will be apparent immediately. The staff doesn't make excuses for the lack of space — they make do and they do it with genuine commitment to patient comfort. It doesn't take an engineering degree to figure out that the options for remodel and/or renovation are seriously limited — despite the former CEO suggesting that it would be no problem to just remove the mountain behind the hospital to secure additional space!

    Architects generally think anything is possible, and of course that’s true if money is no limitation. But the people paying the bills look to experienced contractors for advice on major construction projects. I spent my professional career involved in the construction and renovation of dozens of public facilities and I believe the decision to abandon a facility and move to new construction is one that should be done only after careful consideration of all other financially viable options. The concept of throwing good money after bad is something that happens frequently when institutions attempt to take the repair and/or renovation option on the grand scale that would be required at Lake Chelan Community Hospital. Sometimes it makes sense — this is not one of those times.

    I urge you to talk with people who have recent patient experience at LCCH or visit the the facility yourself and use your own common sense about what option is best for the long term interests of our community. Pretend that you are responsible for the expenditure of funds to provide a hospital facility to meet the basic and emergency needs for yourself and your loved ones. What decision would you make in that case?

    Sincerely,

    Wendy Griffiths Redman


    C O R R E C T I O N
    At the request of John Peterson of Riverfront Wealth Management Group,
    GoLakeChelan inserts the following:


    Good morning

    A reader of Go Lake Chelan alerted me to a letter sent by Troy Hawkins regarding the proposed issuance of bonds by the Lake Chelan Community Hospital.

    In the letter he stated that D.A.Davidson was the underwriter of the Town Toyota Center 2008 bond issue.

    The under writer of that issue was Piper, Jaffray, and Co.

    Please see the link to the S.E.C. website to confirm.
    SEC WEB-SITE - CLICK HERE.
    We would appreciate a correction.
    Thank you,
    JOHN PETERSON, CWS®| SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT
    Financial Advisor, Branch Manager
    Riverfront Wealth Management Group
    Advisors with D.A. Davidson & Co.
    151 S. Worthen St. #201
    Wenatchee, WA 98801
    509.664.9063
    Manson resident and voter Troy Hawwkins writes why he is encouraging voters to Vote No:

    Letter to the Editor
    Submitted by Trow Hawkins

    Dear Chelan Valley,

    As a resident of Manson for the last 11 years, which still only qualifies me as a new comer and outsider, I would like to address the hospital bond issue. Of course, all of us want the best health care we can get. The question is how to obtain it with economic smarts. The current hospital is old. It does need updating and perhaps it needs to be scrapped altogether. The question should be how we can get the best healthcare at the best price. With that in mind, there are issues that I don't think many people have looked at from a money standpoint.

    In 2008 the hospital decided to purchase land, over the objection of many in this valley, for a new hospital facility. The land was purchased for over 4 million dollars before a public vote on the approx. 30 million bond. The bond failed. The money spent on the land, plus money spent on 3 bond requests, plus the time value of money over the last 7 years would give the hospital about 10 million dollars in its bank account. This is more that half the amount of money they are asking the voters for in the upcoming bond issue. Was this good business?

    Opponents and supporters of the bond may not have a full understanding of how this process will work. A 19 million bond will actually cost about 55 million dollars over the 30 year life of the bond. When you couple that amount with the 12 million that the hospital says it has in grants, gifts and savings accounts, the real cost of the new hospital will be near the 80 million dollar mark. In 30 years, we will probably be in the same boat, with an outdated hospital in need of upgrades and new equipment. The new bond that the hospital is asking for is going to be underwritten by (NOTE: Name deleted per letter on the right) XXXXXX, the same underwriter used by the Town Toyota Center. That makes me very nervous.

    There are a lot of smart business people in this valley who would probably be willing to form a community board that can work with the hospital administration to help plan and spend money to upgrade or build a new facility in a more prudent manner than spending at least 80 million for it. I always cringe when I see fire districts, schools and hospitals asking for money and the biggest public supporters are employees or are affiliated financially in some way with the organization wanting more money. If Microsoft wanted more money and they could get it by asking for taxpayers to float a bond for them ..... every Microsoft employee would have a sign in their yard supporting the bond. The Dr's of the clinic who wrote a letter supporting the bond issue "100%" should recuse themselves from this discussion. They recently sold their clinic to the hospital. Way too many conflicts of interest for my liking. When public entities ask for money and have to go get other public entities to publicly support them, like school districts supporting a hospital request for more public money, it leaves me with a bad taste in my mouth. Public entities always want more money, just like private citizens do! Private citizens have to earn their money while public entities can take it out of their neighbors pockets with a vote!

    Certainly if a new hospital is needed, it can be built in stages. It would cost taxpayers substantially less money and it could actually allow for better, more expensive equipment to be located in the hospital, all at a reduced cost to taxpayers. Spending millions of dollars on interest payments through DA Davidson municipal bonds isn't as good of an idea as putting the money directly into the facility. There are a whole lot of options for getting the best value for our healthcare dollar that don't entail spending more that 80 million on a hospital facility over 30 years. By the way, I am not counting the value of the money that was used to buy land for the new facility. Total costs could and probably will exceed 100 million for 30 years for having a new hospital in Chelan. We can do better as citizens, and the hospital board and administrators ought to listen to the business people of the valley regarding options that are fiscally smart and healthcare wise. Up to this point they have been unwilling to listen to alternative ideas from unaffiliated business people in this valley.

    A NO vote will force both sides into discussions that should have taken place already.
    Do we need upgrades to our healthcare in this valley? Probably so.
    Do we need to throw millions of dollars away in interest payments to bond holders rather than putting all of our money to work right here in the valley. No we don't.

    Vote No on the bond and then immediately start planning on how to get the healthcare we need at a price we can afford. It can be done and everyone will be better off!

    Regards,

    Troy Hawkins

    Click Here for Previous Letters to the Editor & Op-Ed Comments on This Election Topic
    With interest in the Lake Chelan Community Hospital Bond Issue increasing as Election Day approaches on Nov 4th, GoLakeChelan has made the decision to publish responsible "Letters to The Editor" and "Op-Ed Positions" on this topic from members of the community with the hope that open, healthy dialogue will give voters the best information.

    Unlike our earlier Facebook Forum (which we terminated) letters published on our home page will be moderated (that is approved before being published), and may be edited to fit our format, or returned with a request that they be shorter.

    Letters need to be submitted by email to and must include the authors name, valid email and working phone number. We will call and verify the authenticity of the author before publishing. The authors phone number and email will not be published at the author's request, but will be available to readers who requests to know.

    We ask that submissions be civil and concise and respectful of those with differing opinions. Our goal is to provide for responsible dialogue on this important community issue. We will only publish one letter per writer, and retain the right to decline publishing a letter at our discretion

    Posted by GoLakeChelan on Tuesday, October 21 @ 22:38:24 PDT

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    Concern Over Pending Rain Causes Officials To Issue Special Warning
    PHP-Nuke Oct 21, 2014 - From Press Release

    Officials Issue Weather Warnings For Our Region Due To Impending Rain
    The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office Division of Emergency Management is asking the public to remain attentive during the extended rainfall event predicted for the remainder of this week.

    Citizens residing within, or adjacent to wildfire burn scar areas caused by either the 2013 or 2014 summer fires are asked to be especially vigilant.

    Heavy or extended rainfall over a burn scar can cause debris flows and mud slides which may create a public safety hazard.

    Anyone who observes a hazard or potential hazard during the extended rainfall is encouraged to contact the Emergency Management Office at 509-667-6863 or RIVERCOM dispatch at 509-663-9911.


    HYDROLOGIC STATEMENT
    National Weather Service Spokane, WA
    1111 AM PDT TUE OCT 21 2014
    ...Significant incoming moisture from the Pacific will bring a steady rain to the Cascades which will potentially affect creeks streams and rivers...

    The steeper slopes burned this past summer in Chelan and Okanogan counties could experience some mud slides due to the upcoming period of steady rainfall. Large flash floods or debris flows are not expected since rain intensity will be low throughout the event.

    If you notice creeks that are backing up behind plugged culverts or debris dams and are coming out of their banks...please call your local emergency management officials or the National Weather Service so an alert message can be widely distributed.

    Another round of rain is anticipated toward the beginning of next week which may affect the Cascade area as well.

    Citizens may monitor current water levels on the this web-site: CLICK HERE

    Posted by GoLakeChelan on Tuesday, October 21 @ 21:07:52 PDT

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http://englandchiro.com


    Open House at Forest Service in Tonasket
    USFS Shannon O’Brien, Public Affairs Specialist, USFS - October 21, 2014
    Open House at Forest Service in Tonasket
    Tonasket Ranger District will host an open house from 5:00-7:00 on Tuesday, October 28, 2014.

    The purpose of the Open House is twofold. First, it will be an opportunity to learn more about a proposal for restoration work in the Bonaparte Mountain area. The Open House will also serve as an opportunity to meet Matt Reidy, the new Tonasket District Ranger.

    The proposal for the Light Restoration project includes approximately 8,600 acres of land in the Upper Bonaparte watershed, north of Highway 20. So far, the proposal includes restoration work to promote ponderosa pine, western larch, aspen, Engelmann spruce, lodgepole pine and subalpine fir while maintaining Large Tree and Old Forest stands and reducing canopy density. It also includes ladder fuel reduction. A road analysis for the project area will include identification of unneeded roads, which may be closed or obliterated, and inadequate culverts that would be repaired as funding allows. Activities to protect riparian areas are also being considered.

    Matt Reidy, who started as Tonasket’s District Ranger on October 20, will be on hand to meet with visitors and discuss Forest management. He hails from New Mexico, where he has been District Ranger on the Mount Taylor Ranger District of the Cibola National Forest. Matt succeeds Dale Olson who left in late April for a District Ranger Position in Montana.

    For more information about the Open House, the Light Restoration Project, or to schedule a meeting with the new District Ranger, please call 509-486-2186.


    Posted by gregory_kennedy on Tuesday, October 21 @ 11:30:45 PDT

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    Chelan County PUD Commissioners Review Building Blocks of Next Year’s Budget
    Chelan County PUD Kimberlee Craig, CCPUD - October 21, 2014
    Click Here for the OurPublicPower.org website
    Chelan County PUD Commissioners Review Building Blocks of Next Year’s Budget
    Key assumptions include no increase in electric rates and need to create value for customer-owners

    Chelan County PUD commissioners and staff Monday reviewed the key assumptions for writing the District’s 2015 budget, including the expectation that proposed projects and staffing will create long-term value for the District’s customer-owners.

    Mark O’Bryan , strategic financial planning director, said items in next year’s budget will align with the five-year business plans, meet or exceed compliance, regulatory and safety requirements and include a look at the scope of projects to confirm the best value for the PUD and its customers.

    Among the key assumptions are no change in retail electric, water and wastewater rates or wholesale fiber rates. Plans are to pay down another $122.6 million in long-term debt. Other factors are:
    • Limited additional impacts from the Wanapum Dam drawdown
    • Some improvement in power market prices
    • Continued low interest rates on investments
    • Continued regulatory requirement increases
    Some of the major projects forecast for next year are refurbishing two generating units at Rock Island Dam, camping upgrades at Lincoln Rock State Park, the fiber network BPON to GPON upgrade, a new substation in Cashmere and repairs to the first of the four large units at Rocky Reach Dam.

    Commissioners will start review of the proposed 2015 budget at a 1 p.m. hearing on Nov. 3 during the next regular board meeting. Discussions will continue on Nov. 17 with a second hearing. Staff plans to ask for board approval of the budget on Dec. 1.

    Customer-owners and community members are invited to join the discussion by emailing comments to .

    In other business Monday, commissioners:
    • Reviewed the next steps in strategic planning. The goal is to have the new plan in place by March 30, 2015, said George Velazquez, strategic project manager. Topic teams have evaluated more than 1,100 ideas from customer-owners and employees to develop sets of options. Commissioners emphasized the need for topic team members to be neutral in presenting the options. A guide summarizing the options is being written to share them with the community. Commissioners will preview the guide on Nov. 3. Details on the timeline for gathering community feedback will be posted on www.ourpublicpower.org.

    Posted by gregory_kennedy on Tuesday, October 21 @ 11:24:47 PDT

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    Drivers May Begin Using Studded Tires in November
    WSDOT Barbara LaBoe, WSDOT Communications - October 21, 2014
    Drivers May Begin Using Studded Tires in November
    Winter’s on its way; make sure you and your vehicle are prepared

    Winter will be here before you know it, so now’s the time to make sure you—and your vehicle—are ready for snow and ice.

    The keys to emerging from the winter-driving season unscathed: slow down and plan ahead. There are no major storms on the immediate horizon, but Washington State Department of Transportation officials say drivers still need to be ready.

    “Prepare your car and prepare yourself for winter conditions,” said Monty Mills, WSDOT’s snow-and-ice program manager. “When the temperature drops, drivers all over the state need to be ready. We’ll be working to keep the highways open, but we’ll need drivers’ help.”

    WSDOT asks drivers to always “know before you go” and get the most up-to-date roadway information and winter-driving tips on the agency’s winter driving Web page.

    Here’s what drivers can do to prepare for icy and snowy roads:
    • Download the WSDOT mobile app for smartphones.
    • Sign up for email updates or follow any of WSDOT’s regional accounts on Twitter.
    • Download, print and carry the WSDOT Winter Driving Guide.
    • Get your car ready and plan extra time to cross all mountain passes, including heavily traveled routes such as Snoqualmie Pass, Stevens Pass and White Pass.
    • Carry chains and know current traction and chain requirements for mountain passes, which are also available on highway-advisory signs and highway-advisory radio.
    • Preset 530 AM and 1610 AM, WSDOT’s traffic-information stations, on your vehicle’s radio.
    Some vehicle manufacturers recommend against the use of tire chains. The Washington State Patrol provides a list of approved, alternative-traction devices that are acceptable when chains or traction tires are required.

    Studded tires are legal for use only between Nov. 1 and March 31 in Washington state. Motorists are encouraged to visit a tire dealer to learn more about traction tires that are legal for year-round use. More information about studded-tired restrictions and requirements can be found in the FAQ on the WSP website.

    Posted by gregory_kennedy on Tuesday, October 21 @ 11:04:14 PDT

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    Halloween Safety Tips from Chelan Fire and Rescue
    Chelan Fire and Rescue Faye Barker - October 21, 2014
    Halloween Safety Tips from Chelan Fire and Rescue
    Halloween is a celebration of fun, fright and candy! To help you stay safe during the goulish season, Chelan Fire and Rescue has put together some Halloween safety tips.
    • When choosing a costume, stay away from billowing or long trailing fabric. If your child is wearing a mask, make sure the eye holes are large enough so they can see out.
    • Provide children with flashlights to carry for lighting or glow sticks as part of their costume.
    • Dried flowers, cornstalks and crepe paper are highly flammable. Keep these and other decorations well away from all open flames and heat sources, including light bulbs and heaters.
    • It is safest to use a flashlight or battery-operated candle in a jack-o-lantern. If you use a real candle, use extreme caution. Make sure children are watched at all times when candles are lit. When lighting candles inside jack-o-lanterns, use long, fireplace style matches or a utility lighter. Be sure to place lit pumpkins well away from anything that can burn and far enough out of the way of trick-or-treaters, doorsteps, walkways and yards.
    • Remember to keep exits clear of decorations, so nothing blocks escape routes.
    • Tell children to stay away from open flames. Be sure they know how to stop, drop and roll if their clothing catches fire. (Have them practice, stopping immediately, dropping to the ground, covering their face with hands, and rolling over and over to put the flames out.)
    • Use flashlights as alternatives to candles or torch lights when decorating walkways and yards. They are much safer for trick-or-treaters, whose costumes may brush against the lighting.
    • If your children are going to Halloween parties at others’ homes, have them look for ways out of the home and plan how they would get out in an emergency.
    Have a safe and fun Halloween!

    Posted by gregory_kennedy on Tuesday, October 21 @ 10:32:04 PDT

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    Lake Chelan Hospital/Manson School Cross Country Fun Run
    Lake Chelan Hospital News Updates Celeste Thomas - October 21, 2014
    Click Here for the Photo Gallery on Facebook
    Lake Chelan Hospital/Manson School Cross Country Fun Run
    On September 27 the Lake Chelan Community Hospital partnered with Manson School Cross Country to put on a Family Fun Run with Max in conjunction with the first annual Trojan Cross Country Invitational.

    160 people of all ages participated in the fun run held at the old golf course in Manson, next to Mill Bay Casino. About 300 people participated in all during the full day of running events.
    RESULTS
    
    2.5 k (girls)              2.5K (boys)          
    1st. Aleasha England       1st. Maddoc Fich     
    2nd. Kate England          2nd. Jamison England 
    3rd. Christine Zandell     3rd. Malachi Sanchez 
                                                    
    5k (girls)                 5k (boys)            
    1st. Hadley Blasey         1st. Jairo de la Cruz
    2nd. Emily Alejo           2nd. Nathan Murillo  
    3rd. Lisa England          3rd. Phil Thomas
    


    Posted by gregory_kennedy on Tuesday, October 21 @ 10:17:57 PDT

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http://www.golakechelan.com/?name=News&file=article&sid=17299


    More Lake Chelan Voters Weigh In On The Lake Chelan Hospital Bond Proposition
    PHP-Nuke Oct 20, 2014
    Below We Add 3 More 'Letters To The Editor' On The Lake Chelan Hospital Bond Measure

  • - From Manson Resident Pat Hautenne
  • - From Chelan Resident Brent Morrison
  • - From Chelan Resident Lisa Garvich
  • By Pat Hautenne

    Dear Friends,

    An earlier letter on GoLakeChelan by Hospital Commissioner Mary Signorelli made reference to an opinion written by Manson resident and Professional Architect, Larry Hibbard. Mr Hibbard's letter was emailed to many in the valley, including myself.
    To assist those who may not have received or read Mr Hibbard's thinking on this topic, I have ask, and been given his permission, to submit it here. Larry Hibbard writes:
    Dear Friends,

    A strong local hospital is essential for the health and well being of all of us living and visiting the valley. We are fortunate that after many years of financial difficulties our hospital is now operating on a strong financial base. It has been operating in the black with $500,000 to $1,000,000 annual profits.

    It is unfortunate that during the last 15 to 20 years there has been minimal maintenance, only hasty repairs, and no long range planning for the future of our existing hospital facility. Instead, our hospital commissioners have focused on getting a new hospital.

    In the process they have spent several million dollars of our money on plans and PR for a new facility, while neglecting the solid building we have with its wonderful views of the valley. The Commissioners are again asking us to approve a very large 30 year bond issue for a new hospital.

    During the last six months I have spent hours with Kevin Abel, the hospital CEO asking questions, learning more about hospitals, reviewing studies, looking at plans and analyzing reports. I worked for the hospital as an architect for more than 15 years during which time 15,200 sq ft of new space were added to our hospital. I know the facility well. But the process of getting current and accurate information about the needs and decisions surrounding a new hospital has been quite difficult and revealing.

    My conclusion, following my investigation, is that the construction of a new hospital is not in the best interest of quality health care in the valley and is not economically responsible. I have also concluded that there is a very viable option, which has not been seriously considered, that can provide us with a hospital that can offer as good or better medical services as a new hospital while costing much less than a new hospital. We can demonstrate responsible stewardship of our resources by taking care of what we have and not throwing away a solid, functional building.

    Our best option is to remodel and expand our existing hospital. Our hospital has been neglected and it has problems, but the problems can be fixed. Our present operating hospital has a value of well over $20,000,000. An appraisal done for the hospital shows its value to be $2,100,000 (very optimistic) if we abandon it. If the building can not be sold and needs to be demolished, it would be of negative value. Our community cannot afford to throw away $20,000,000. I have based my opinion on the following:

    The “bones” and most systems in our hospital are in good shape. There are no structural problems with the building. It is the only fully non-combustible rated building in the valley.

    While the original concrete building is 42 years old, a third of the hospital space, is less than 20 years old and is in good shape. Study after study have shown that structurally sound buildings can be renovated for significantly less money than building new, especially when the building’s function is not changed. Structurally sound hospitals are not abandoned; they are renovated because reuse is most economical.

    The “code issues” of accessibility and energy can easily be addressed in a remodel. These items can easily be fixed as part of a remodel

    The whole third floor, the most recent addition to the hospital, is less than 20 years old. The third floor has few, if any code issues and would require only minimal renovation.

    The present hospital site is tight, but there are options for expansion. The hospital owns the hillside behind and the building below. Adjacent property to the west can most likely be purchased.

    The proposed new hospital will not increase the number of certified beds in the hospital or add new hospital services. (per letter from hospital administrator dated 9/29/2014) If administrative and clinical functions are moved into a new addition, their space in the hospital, including old patient rooms that are now being used for other functions can again be used for patient rooms providing more options for room options without having to build new patient rooms from scratch that are very expensive . Administrative space can be constructed at less than one third the cost of hospital patient care areas, if they are separated from the patient areas.

    The full cost of a new hospital will be close to $40,000,000. The $31,000,000 cost given by the hospital supporters does not include the $4,100,000 cost of the land (that was purchased with out any public discussion or voter support), soil mitigation or the cost of decommissioning the existing hospital. The amount budgeted for moving and start-up is $3-5 million less than similar hospitals have experienced. There are internal reports that anticipate the total cost of a new hospital to be $38,000,000 - $40,000,000. The cost of the new hospital will be similar to that of Wenatchee’s Toyota Center.

    Renovation of the existing hospital will not require abandoning a very valuable and solid 43,600 sq ft community resource. The hospital commissioners have no viable plan for reuse of the existing hospital. Heritage Heights has been given first refusal, but it is highly unlikely that they can justify tripling the size of their facilities or justify renovation costs that for them would be much higher than constructing new. The hospital building does not lend itself to senior housing because the large amount of interior area is not suitable for living space, as well numerous other reasons. Hospitals are specific purpose buildings with complex and expensive infrastructure that do not lend themselves to other uses. This is why hospitals are not abandoned, they are renovated and expanded when expansion is justified. Abandoning the hospital is both irresponsible and overly expensive.

    While economic development is not part of the hospital’s mission, studies have also shown that the local economic benefit of a remodel compared to new construction is considerably greater because remodels are more labor intensive, a local benefit, and use less money on materials which are imported.

    A renovation/addition to the existing hospital would cost much less and may be able to be done without an additional burden to the valley of a $19 million, 30-year, bond issue. A renovation/addition can be completed in the range of $17 to 20 million if keeping the basic program to that of a critical care hospital. (This is a whole discussion in itself that I would be willing to discuss further and to show how I have calculated the costs) To pay for the renovation we could use the $5,000,000 or so that the hospital has in reserve, the sale of the $4,100,000 contaminated site they recently purchased, and the sale of $10,000,000 in non-voted bonds as the Commission is proposing for the new hospital.

    In the costly community survey commissioned by the hospital earlier this year 11% of the respondents worked for the hospital. Even with this bias, it did not show that residents saw anything particularly bad about the hospital except its parking and waiting room. Patient care and hospital services were generally rated lower than facility concerns.

    Abandoning the hospital for a new hospital puts another community resource in possible jeopardy. Heritage Heights shares an access with the hospital and its residents depend on the convenience and support of the hospital adjacent to it. Heritage Heights has been given first option if the hospital is abandoned, but the hospital is neither economically nor functionally adaptable for senior housing.

    There are hundreds of examples of successful hospital renovations, including the Leavenworth, Ritzville, and Prosser hospitals in our area. Communities don’t abandon their hospitals. Responsible, caring communities maintain and take care of their community resources and build from them. Some people in this community might have the money to pay for a new hospital, for the sake of having something new. But a majority of people in our valley can not afford the additional cost when there is no apparent difference in the resulting quality of health care.

    I will be voting NO, to Save our Hospital.

    Sincerely,
    Larry Hibbard
    Thank you for reading Larry Hibbards thoughts.
    I respect his professional knowledge and he convinces me that the new facility near Wal Mart is not the best solution to guaranteeing long range quality healthcare that we can all afford. I encourage you to Vote No on this proposition, Nov 4th

    Sincerely,
    Pat Hautenne




    Lake Chelan resident and voter Brent Morrison writes:

    Those opposing the Bond Measure have made mention of
  • - New Property Acquisition,
  • - New Access Routes, etc.,
  • - In addition to the cost of remodeling the existing facility.

    I think that it would only be fair, for comparison purposes, for those folks to itemize out those additional costs.

    Brent Morrison


  • Lake Chelan resident and voter Lisa Garvich writes why she strongly supports the new hospital proposal:

    Letter to the Editor
    Submitted by Lisa Garvich

    Just over a year ago my husband had a stroke, it was totally unexpected.
    He is the picture of good health, doesn’t smoke, doesn’t drink, not overweight, active and an advocate for healthy eating.
    Yet it happened to him… and lucky for us all of the services he needed were right here.

    Time is not on your side when a stroke occurs, things need to happen quickly and it was critical that he get treatment immediately to reduce the damage.

    The Lake Chelan EMS and Fire & Rescue teams were impeccable, working hand-in-hand to care for him and get him to the hospital quickly. Once at the hospital he received the highest level of care by qualified doctors, nurses and physical therapists.
    We credit his recovery to the care he received here in Chelan.

    No one knows when they will get sick or have a medical emergency but there is comfort in knowing when you or someone close to you needs it; it’s right here.
    But this is not the only reason I’m voting yes.

    A YES vote will:
    1)- Provide an updated hospital that will keep this community vital and provide continued local health care and treatment, education and better overall health opportunities for all of us.
    2)- Provide a new building that will enhance efficiency and patient care, not to mention help to meet ADA compliant regulations and other federal standards for hospitals, such as patient privacy.
    3)- Build a new facility that will continue to provide needed jobs right here in our community.
    4)- Allow us to keep our round-the clock urgent and emergency care (i.e. can’t have an ER without inpatient beds under Medicare rules and to be cost effective).
    5)- May very well help to keep us from losing medical clinics associated with the hospital, specialist practices and other treatment services like physical and occupational therapy, having these close to home is so important to everyone.
    6)- Continue to provide us with the opportunity to participate in classes and wellness programs close to home and take a real proactive approach to keeping ourselves and family members healthy.
    7)- Save money on expensive maintenance and repairs, that doesn’t really fix the problems, create the needed space or bring our hospital into the 21st century.

    Join me in Voting Yes for so many good reasons!

    Sincerely
    Lisa Garvich
    Click Here for Previous Letters to the Editor & Op-Ed Comments on This Election Topic
    With interest in the Lake Chelan Community Hospital Bond Issue increasing as Election Day approaches on Nov 4th, GoLakeChelan has made the decision to publish responsible "Letters to The Editor" and "Op-Ed Positions" on this topic from members of the community with the hope that open, healthy dialogue will give voters the best information.

    Unlike our earlier Facebook Forum (which we terminated) letters published on our home page will be moderated (that is approved before being published), and may be edited to fit our format, or returned with a request that they be shorter.

    Letters need to be submitted by email to and must include the authors name, valid email and working phone number. We will call and verify the authenticity of the author before publishing. The authors phone number and email will not be published at the author's request, but will be available to readers who requests to know.

    We ask that submissions be civil and concise and respectful of those with differing opinions. Our goal is to provide for responsible dialogue on this important community issue. We will only publish one letter per writer, and retain the right to decline publishing a letter at our discretion

    Posted by GoLakeChelan on Monday, October 20 @ 23:05:12 PDT

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    Free Diabetes Support Group Meetings Oct 28-29
    GLC Community News John Swenson - October 20, 2014
    Free Diabetes Support Group Meetings Oct 28-29
    Free Diabetes Support Group meetings are being offered for diabetic patients and their family members. They are being held on the 4th Tuesday (28th) and Wednesday (29th) of October.

    The meetings will be presented by Claudia N. Swenson, Pharm.D., CDE (Certified Diabetic Educator), BC-ADM (Board Certified Advanced Diabetes Manager).

    Tuesday - October 28th - North Shore Bible Church in Manson - 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

    Wednesday - October 29th - Chelan Valley Hope in Chelan - 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

    Posted by gregory_kennedy on Monday, October 20 @ 12:20:57 PDT

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    Wednesday October 22 is National Unity Day
    Lake Chelan School District Sara Anderson - October 20, 2014
    Click Here for the National Bullying Prevention Center website
    Wednesday October 22 is National Unity Day
    Make it ORANGE and make it end! Unite against bullying!

    “What are your true colors when it comes to bullying? If you care about safe and supportive schools and communities make your color ORANGE on Unity Day. That’s the day everyone can come together—in schools, communities, and online—and send one large ORANGE message of support, hope, and unity.” --pacer.org

    Students at MOE, CMS, and CHS will be doing activities to unite against bullying and we are encouraging all of our staff members to wear orange this Wednesday.

    Posted by gregory_kennedy on Monday, October 20 @ 12:03:22 PDT

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    Freaky Fall Festival in Stehekin October 25th
    Strictly Fun Herb Sargo - October 20, 2014
    Freaky Fall Festival in Stehekin October 25th
    Join the spooky fun in Stehekin on October 25th at the Fall Festival.

    There will be games, food and fun and it all takes place in the Golden West Visitor Center at Stehekin.

    The doors open at 6:30 p.m. Costumes are optional and so is bringing an hors d'oeuvre or dessert. Please spread the word. Hope to see you there!

    Posted by gregory_kennedy on Monday, October 20 @ 11:41:37 PDT

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    1st Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Fair at Acacia Event Center Nov 8-9
    Strictly Fun Shelly Ward - October 20, 2014
    1st Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Fair at Acacia Event Center Nov 8-9
    The 1st Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Fair will be held at the Acacia Event Center November 8th and 9th.

    There will be wine tasting and pictures with Santa for "people and pets". There will also be a "Best Pie" contest with Blueberry Kari as one of the judges. The winner will take home the entry fee "pot" and win the "Acacia King/Queen of Pie 2014" title.

    In addition, $5 Raffle tickets for a HUGE Christmas basket to benefit Chelan Valley Hope will be on sale.

    There will be wine and spirits, fine chocolates, holiday goodies, and gift certificates for lots of great things. Let's just say the winner will be ready for Christmas entertaining and much more.

    The drawing will be held November 29th at the Acacia Comedy Show with Star Comedian Brad Upton drawing the winner. Both events will benefit Chelan Valley Hope!

    Posted by gregory_kennedy on Monday, October 20 @ 11:31:27 PDT

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http://bluewaterconcierge.com


    Other Recent Articles

    Monday, October 20
    · Photo Artist Lora Cleveland at Manson Community Library Through November
    · City of Chelan Special Meeting October 21
    · Valley Resident Bill Worth Asks Voters To VOTE NO on LCCH Bond Levy
    · Sink or Swim - Cardboard Boats Test Student Designs
    · Buckner Orchard Harvest Fest 2014 Recap
    · TEE Time for October 6, 2014
    · LCCH Foundation Receives Major Gift from Rio Tinto and Magnus Pacific
    · Blood Drive at Manson High October 22nd
    · Space Heater Safety Tips
    · Small Earthquake Felt Near Chelan Late Sunday
    Sunday, October 19
    · Community Voices Speaking Out On The Upcoming Bond Levy
    · Chelan Chase 2014 Is In The Books - And We Peek at the Numbers
    · Downtown Chelan Has New Idea For Halloween!
    Friday, October 17
    · Chelan Chase Is Today (Saturday Oct 18th) Drivers Be Alert!
    · Peter Rutherford, MD, CEO of Confluence Health Endorses Lake Chelan Hospital Bon
    · Washington State Poet Laureate Visiting October 21st
    · City of Chelan Working on 2015 City Budget
    · Portside Luncheon Lays Out Economic Forecast for Region
    Thursday, October 16
    · Lake Chelan Hospital CEO Reaches Out To Community
    · Highlights from Last Week's City Council Meeting
    Wednesday, October 15
    · Northshore Church Welcomes New Worship/Youth Pastor
    Tuesday, October 14
    · CHS FIVE STAR CLUBS SAYS THANKS TO ALL - HONORS CAMPBELL'S
    Monday, October 13
    · City of Chelan & Port of Chelan County Hold Joint Meeting
    · Former Hospital Administrator Addresses The Communitty
    · Lake Chelan School District Mentor Program is Working Well!
    · Local Talent, Tyler James, Launches a Kickstarter Project
    · Election Day Is Nearing - Are You Ready ?
    Sunday, October 12
    · Freedom Foundation Op-Ed Discusses Their Position on Recent Initiative To City
    Friday, October 10
    · Lake Chelan Hospital Holding Another Public Invited Bond Q & A Session
    · Improved Communication System for Fire & EMS Serving the South Shore To Be Ready
    · Announcing ESL Classes for the Valley
    · Chelan PUD Leaders Wanting To Discuss Lake Level Management Next Week
    · Take a Kid Mountain Biking Was Lots of Fun!
    Wednesday, October 08
    · Lake Chelan Hosts 26th Annual Marine Law Enforcement Conference
    · Chelan PUD Upgrading Bad Sections of Wood Boardwalk in Riverwalk Park
    Tuesday, October 07
    · A MUST DO FAMILY EVENT THIS COMING WEEKEND AT ORONDO CIDER WORKS!
    · A Historical Review of Lake Chelan Landfills as Posted in 2011
    · Port of Chelan County Holding Special Meeting in Chelan, Oct 15th at Campbell's
    · Two Young People Held While Authorities Investigate Homicide in Okanogan County
    · Mehogany & Merlot Good for The Town?
    Monday, October 06
    · Halloween Carnival Planned at Chelan Library
    · Wenatchee Police Enlist Community Help Finding Missing 26 year Old Woman
    · Mahogany & Merlot ... The Best Ever!
    · Chelan Superior Court Rules 3 Fingers Must Be Removed
    · Lake Chelan Reclamation District Seeking Board Candidates
    Saturday, October 04
    · Customers and Community Invited to Celebrate Benefits of Public Power This Week
    · Fall Recreation on National Forest in Okanogan County
    · Chelan Middle School Students of the Month for Oct 2014
    · ''Art with Heart'' Grant Triples Amount of Art Books
    · Get Ahead of the Winter Freeze

    Older Articles

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    Date: Saturday, October 25, 2014
    Time: 07:00 AM
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    Skies: Overcast and lightly raining with a cloud level at 2000 feet.
    Barometer: 29.64 inches and falling.
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    Jerry Isenhart
    Box 1000
    Chelan, Wa 98816
    509-860-3641


    Steve Byquist
    509-670-0426


    Richard Uhlhorn
    509-679-0282 ~ 509-682-0602


    Heidi Neal
    Cell: 630-3115


    Nancy Miller
    Phone 509-687-9743


    Gregory Kennedy
    509-630-7679


    Dave Rogge
    509-679-8931



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